Epidemic of movie remakes

Sydney Allison-Smith, Staff Writer

     Anyone who cares at all about movies can agree remakes are never as good as the originals. I only watch them to effectively bash modern media and reconfirm my superiority complex. Almost exactly like what I am doing in this article.

     This goes for sequels, spinoffs and practically any re-creation of a classic movie. These will simply not succeed in my and many others’ opinions.

     A personal exception may be in the 2020 TV show remake of High Fidelity. It was not banging my head against a wall- painful, and that is all you can really ask for when watching a remake. 

     It truly was an entertaining show, sort of just lengthening the movie into the form of a 10 episode series. Although I thought it was an acceptable remake, it could never compare to the absolute work of art that was the 2000 movie with phenomenal acting from John Cusack.

     This is the exact issue for most film enthusiasts. People like the classics. When movies get remade with bad acting and an even worse soundtrack, those who were fans of the original definitely can not stand the new version. 

     One of the most talked-about disappointing remakes was Godzilla (1998). This movie was so God-awful that Steven Spielberg refused to watch it because he did not want to ruin the memory of the known and loved Godzilla of 1954.

     I genuinely can not understand why there is a need for 17 Pride and Prejudices. It is really starting to seem like these people are just running out of ideas. Jane Austen would turn over in her grave if she knew her book was made into a movie about a vlogger in 2019.

     Money is presumably the motive for these remakes because they are completely lacking in creativity and overall effort. However, this also makes no sense because the remakes are doing horribly in sales too. I might not be as distraught if people were actually going to see these Pride and Prejudice movies. But you are lying if you say you have seen any other version besides the one with Keira Knightly.

     The 2020 remake of West Side Story only grossed $38 million at the box office… Seeing as it cost over $100 million dollars to produce, this was a major flop. 

     This could be because of controversial actors or inadequate promotion, or it could be that absolutely no one asked for this. Older people were happy with the favorite 1961 love story and really did not want to live to see it redone.

     People like their movies and do not want them tampered with in any way. Remakes are generally always worse than the original and can ruin the magic for some people. What amount of bad reviews and comically low box office sales do we need to prove that the people do not want any more remakes?